These Nearly Impossible Geography Questions Can Only Be Answered by Grade-Schoolers

Watch National Geographic staff try to answer some of the same questions asked to student contestants in the National Geography Bee. PUBLISHED May 18, 2018 Tune-in Wednesday morning on National Geographic’s YouTube channel and Facebook page to watch the live final round of the National Geographic Bee. Play along at home with our GeoBee Challenge…

Watch for These 8 Things at the Royal Wedding

PUBLISHED May 18, 2018 British royal weddings are often rooted in custom. Many of the ceremonies—particularly those of close relatives of the queen—share striking similarities. You Might Also Like Celebrations usually include lavish cakes with several tiers, the wedding couple often rides to and from their ceremony in a carriage, and, in the past, the…

How People Make Only a Jar of Trash a Year

PUBLISHED May 18, 2018 This story is part of Planet or Plastic?—our multiyear effort to raise awareness about the global plastic waste crisis. Learn what you can do to reduce your own single-use plastics, and take your pledge. Join a conversation with Kathryn Kellogg on zero waste on Reddit at 2 pm ET May 18….

Why You’re Probably Training Your Cat All Wrong

View Images A cat enters a carrier during a training session. Photograph by Sarah Ellis PUBLISHED May 17, 2018 Training has always been part of the deal when you own a dog, though methods have changed a lot over the generations. Cats are a different story—but they shouldn’t be. “People don’t traditionally train cats because…

No, Hawaii’s Volcano Won’t Trigger a Mega-Tsunami

How the Kilauea Eruption Affected this Hawaii Community PUBLISHED May 17, 2018 Hawaii’s famously active volcano Kilauea has been oozing, belching, and releasing gas since early this month, and after several warning signs, the summit finally erupted explosively today. The full of extent of today’s eruption is still being determined, but experts from the U.S….

A Tarantula Sheds its Skin in New Time-Lapse Video

Watch a Time-lapse of a Tarantula Crawling Out of its Own Skin PUBLISHED May 16, 2018 This Mexican red-kneed tarantula is crawling out of its own skin. A time-lapse captured its seven-hour molting process at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens. The venomous but docile tarantula is native to Mexican deserts and scrublands, and is…

Fast Facts About Plastic Pollution

PUBLISHED May 16, 2018 This story is part of Planet or Plastic?—our multiyear effort to raise awareness about the global plastic waste crisis. Learn what you can do to reduce your own single-use plastics, and take your pledge. https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/05/plastics-facts-infographics-ocean-pollution/

Plastics Explained, From A to Z

View Images The Philippines is the third largest contributor to ocean plastics in the world. Here, garbage is sorted. Photograph by Randy Olson, National Geographic PUBLISHED May 16, 2018 This story is part of Planet or Plastic?—our multiyear effort to raise awareness about the global plastic waste crisis. Learn what you can do to reduce…

Yanny or Laurel? Strange Audio Clip Explained.

View Images An audio clip has the world divided about what they are really hearing. Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic PUBLISHED May 15, 2018 I heard “laurel.” But my coworker heard “yanny.” Welcome to “the dress” debate of 2018. If you were on Twitter today, you also likely heard the viral four-second audio clip…

Who Has the ‘Cleaner’ Bed: Chimps or Humans?

View Images A chimpanzee relaxes in its nest in Nigeria’s Cross River State. Photograph by Cyril Ruoso, Minden Pictures/National Geographic Creative PUBLISHED May 15, 2018 “Take your stinking paws off me, you damn, dirty ape!” Charlton Heston’s line in the 1968 classic Planet of the Apes epitomizes the way most of us view our closest…

This ‘Secret Garden’ of Coral May Be 1,000 Years Old

PUBLISHED May 15, 2018 Lying just over 7,500 feet below the Gulf of Mexico, scientists have found a hidden garden of bamboo coral. According to video published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, scientists haven’t seen anything like it in the Gulf of Mexico so far. The government research group found the dense coral…

Water Geysers Likely Found on This ‘Alien’ Ice Moon

View Images Jupiter’s moon Europa is covered with a thick icy crust thought to cover a vast water ocean that may be able to support life. Photograph by NASA PUBLISHED May 14, 2018 Clues hidden in data from NASA’s Galileo spacecraft—which explored the Jupiter system between 1995 and 2003—suggest very strongly that the icy moonEuropa…

How ‘Tequila Bats’ Find Their Pups

PUBLISHED May 12, 2018 Lesser long-nosed bats are working moms. Scientifically they’re called Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, but conservationists know them as the “tequila bats” that pollinate the agave plants used to make the Mexican liquor. After spending their nights looking for nectar, they return to their caves to nurse their pups. It’s no easy task. The…

Failure to Launch: These Animals Stay With Mom For Years

View Images An 11-month-old Bornean orangutan hangs out with its mom. Photograph by Tim Laman, National Geographic Creative PUBLISHED May 12, 2018 We’ve all heard of the boomerang kid—the 20-something who returns from college to live in their parents’ basement—but does that happen in nature? Not too often, but there are a few species who…

Even Remote Coral Reefs Aren’t Spared From Devastation

PUBLISHED May 11, 2018 Coral reefs are in grave danger. Around the world, including at well-known sites like the Great Barrier Reef, the colonies of carbonaceous creatures have faced dramatic losses spurred by climate change, rapidly warming waters, and human activities such as overfishing and water pollution. Starting in 2016, a team of researchers sponsored…

Sharks Prefer Jazz Over Classical Music, Study Finds

View Images A Port Jackson shark swims by in New South Wales. Photograph by Fred Bavendam, Minden Pictures/National Geographic Creative PUBLISHED May 10, 2018 A new study says that sharks might be jazzier than previously thought. Like other fish, sharks are adept at homing in on sounds. Sound waves can travel up to four times…

This Artist Managed to Bottle the Scent of a Person

TECH+ART: Reprogramming Perception Working at the intersection of art and science, Ani Liu creates research-based art that explores the social, cultural, and emotional implications of emerging technologies. PUBLISHED May 10, 2018 This story is part of Women of Impact, a National Geographic project centered around women breaking barriers in their fields, changing their communities, and…

Ground Zero of Amphibian ‘Apocalypse’ Finally Found

View Images Since the 1970s, the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has triggered die-offs in hundreds of amphibian species such as the common midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans). These frogs—arranged in rows by researchers documenting the fungus—died in the French Pyrenees. Photograph by Matthew Fisher PUBLISHED May 10, 2018 Many of the world’s amphibians are staring down…

Large Island Declared Rat-Free in Biggest Removal Success

PUBLISHED May 9, 2018 A remote, freezing, salt-spray lashed paradise for wildlife has been completely cleared of rats in the largest rodent eradication of all time, the South Georgia Heritage Trust (SGHT) announced today. Rats are smart, adaptable, and hungry. For all these reasons, they can be incredibly voracious predators when people accidentally introduce them…

How Scientists Taught a Spider to Jump on Demand

PUBLISHED May 9, 2018 If you’re afraid of spiders, a new study published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports might not come as welcome news. Researchers at the University of Manchester have trained a regal jumping spider named “Kim” to leap on demand. It’s the first time a spider has been successfully trained to jump….

What’s the Difference Between Magma and Lava?

View Images Lava from Hawaii’s volcanoes tends to be comparatively runny due to its lower silica content. Photograph by US Geological Survey PUBLISHED May 8, 2018 Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano keeps erupting with syrupy lava flows, serving as a fiery reminder of nature’s destructive power. But as the ongoing eruption captures headlines, a question might occur…

Why Do So Many People Live Near Active Volcanoes?

PUBLISHED May 8, 2018 When the ground near Leilani Estates opened and began spilling out noxious fumes and lava from Mount Kilauea last week, residents of the neighborhood near the Hawaiian volcano fled. The eruption displaced many people who are living near the most active volcano on Earth, which frequently erupts along its East Rift…

How an Obscure Religious Sect Mapped the Cosmos

PUBLISHED May 8, 2018 In 1651 a London tailor named John Reeve claimed to have received a message from God. «I have chosen thee my last messenger for a great work unto this bloody unbelieving world,” God said, according to Reeve. “And I have given thee Lodowicke Muggleton to be thy mouth.” Muggleton was Reeve’s…

Ancient Flying Predator Found in Transylvania

View Images A skeletal reconstruction of the flying reptile known as Dracula, a giant azhdarchoid pterosaur found in the same region as the newly described fossil animal. Photograph by Aart Walen, Creatures & Features PUBLISHED May 8, 2018 A fossil jaw from Romania is the largest pterosaur bone of its kind ever discovered, hinting that…

Why a Massive Sinkhole Tore Open in New Zealand

PUBLISHED May 7, 2018 New Zealand’s newest sinkhole may be one of its largest. It extends down more than six stories. From end-to-end, it measures just about the length of two football fields. The sinkhole is so large it even exposed 60,000-year-old volcanic soil. New Zealand volcanologist Brad Scott told a local news outlet it…

6 Amazing Structures Built by Surprising Creatures

PUBLISHED May 7, 2018 Life on Earth is constantly shaped by our ever-changing planet. Mountain ranges and sea barriers cut species off from one another, causing new species to emerge or older ones to die out. Volcanoes give birth to islands that pioneering species later settle, becoming adapted to their newfound homes. But this planetary-wide…

It’s Official: Tut’s Tomb Has No Hidden Chambers After All

PUBLISHED May 6, 2018 Recent radar scans of Tutankhamun’s tomb conclusively prove that there are no additional chambers or passages behind the walls of the famed pharaoh’s burial chamber in the Valley of the Kings, Egyptian officials announced today. A statement was released today on behalf of Mostafa Waziri, Secretary General of the Supreme Council…

In Cities, Wildlife Evolves Astonishingly Fast

View Images In Sendai, Japan, carrion crows put walnuts on roads so that vehicles will drive over them, crushing the shells and allowing the birds to get to the food inside. Photograph by Miles Barton, Nature Picture Library PUBLISHED May 5, 2018 Most naturalists turn up their noses at cities, regarding them as anti-nature—sterile wastelands…

Diamond in the Rough: The Final Challenge with Cory Richards

PUBLISHED May 4, 2018 Several years ago, Rolls-Royce announced it would create a mold-breaking SUV that would make luxury travel effortless, everywhere. Now here, the much anticipated new Rolls-Royce Cullinan has embarked on one Final Challenge to test it to the limit. “There’s always incredible value in pushing ourselves beyond what we believe is possible.”…

How Botswana Revived Africa’s Largest Mammal Migration

PUBLISHED May 4, 2018 Drenched in water and completely covered in greenery, it’s nearly impossible to imagine Botswana’s Makgadikgadi Pans as an arid landscape. A region marked by seasonally visible, horizon-bending salt flats connected by the Kalahari Desert’s sandy terrain, the Makgadikgadi Pans merge to form the largest contiguous salt flats in the world, outsizing…

30 Striking Photos from National Geographic’s History

PUBLISHED May 4, 2018 Since its founding in 1888, National Geographic Society has established itself as a pioneer in storytelling. Even before it began publishing photographs on its covers, the magazine provided a platform for sharing immersive, compelling narratives—including stories driven by powerful imagery. Related Stories To commemorate the Society’s 130th anniversary in 2018, National…

Why This Dust Storm in India Turned Deadly

View Images A man wraps a scarf around his nose as a dust storm envelops the city in New Delhi, India. Photograph by Manish Swarup, AP PUBLISHED May 3, 2018 The onset of India’s monsoon season isn’t coming quietly for the northern part of the country. At least 100 people were recently killed by a…

These Owl Chicks Have Two Moms and a Dad—a First

View Images The two female owls huddle near their owlets. Photograph by Dana Trimble PUBLISHED May 2, 2018 When Jim Thomas came into his office one morning in late February, he realized he was not alone. “I heard this racket outside my window,” says Thomas, a hydrologist at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada….

This Tiny Town Is Embracing Its Diversity

PUBLISHED May 2, 2018 The small town of Storm Lake, Iowa, has changed in the last thirty years—and its inhabitants love it. The area has gone through a major demographic shift over the last three decades, according to Storm Lake’s Public Safety Director and Police Chief Mark Prosser, and a variety of ethnic groups now…

Explore the World’s Biggest Cave From Your Couch

PUBLISHED May 2, 2018 At F8, Facebook’s annual developer conference in San Jose, California, the social media company shared updates on React 360, an interactive WebVR and 360 content publisher. Experiences made using the technology can show up across the web and in people’s Facebook News Feeds, effectively bringing virtual reality to its more than…

Dinosaur-Era Bird Found With Shockingly Intact Skull

PUBLISHED May 2, 2018 A delicate but remarkably well-preserved fossil skull is providing new clues to how birds evolved from their dinosaur ancestors. The first known fossil of the ancient bird Ichthyornis was unearthed in 1870 in Kansas, under the direction of legendary fossil-hunter Othniel Charles Marsh. The species hails from a time in the…

The Surprising Origin of Chicken as a Dietary Staple

PUBLISHED May 1, 2018 In this excerpt of Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats, author Maryn McKenna chronicles the rise of the backyard chicken to dietary staple. In 1925 there were more than six million farms in the United States, compared with two…

Here’s How to Watch or Stream ‘Genius: Picasso’

PUBLISHED April 30, 2018 The protagonist of Genius: Picasso was a piece of work, an artistic innovator whose personal life was as fractured as the faces he so famously painted. National Geographic is telling this story across the second season of its Emmy-nominated anthology series Genius. From now until June 19, new episodes will premiere…

Chernobyl’s Mutated Species May Help Protect Astronauts

One Strange Rock: Chernobyl Mutants PUBLISHED April 30, 2018 On the big screen, astronauts face many dangers, from explosions, to suffocating in the vacuum of space, to maniacal red-eyed sentient computers. But perhaps the deadliest threat to real astronauts is one they can’t even see: radiation. Our planet’s magnetic field generates a protective bubble, called…

Meet the Man Who Knew Cecil the Lion Best

View Images Wildlife biologist Andrew Loveridge studied Cecil for seven years after attaching a tracking collar to the lion. Photograph by A. J. Loveridge PUBLISHED April 28, 2018 When he was shot by American trophy hunter Walter Palmer in 2015, Cecil the lion became an instant media sensation, his death mourned around the globe by…

New Alarm System May Stop Poachers In Their Tracks

View Images A new, high-tech alarm system helps rangers in a reserve in South Africa stop poachers from killing rhinos and other wildlife. Photograph courtesy Dimension Data PUBLISHED April 27, 2018 When you’ve heard a shot, it’s already too late. In all likelihood the rhino is dead, and the best outcome is that the poacher…

Shocking Video Shows Impacts of Controversial Fishing Method

PUBLISHED April 27, 2018 Several conservation groups—Sea Legacy, Turtle Island Restoration Network, Sharkwater, and Mercy for Animals—recently released a video clip (above) showing the impact fishing drift nets can have on marine life. Officially labeled drift gillnets, the large nets are used by industrial fishing operations in some parts of the world. In the U.S.,…

Puffin Beaks Glow in Surprising Discovery

View Images A deceased puffin’s beak glows under a black light in the laboratory. Photograph by Jamie Dunning PUBLISHED April 27, 2018 As soon as Jamie Dunning flipped on the black light in his lab, the Atlantic puffin‘s beak lit up like a neon Christmas tree. The University of Nottingham Ph.D. student was studying the…

Why Europe’s Insecticide Ban Is Big News for Bees

Did You Know Humans Have Relied on Bees for 9,000 Years? PUBLISHED April 27, 2018 The European Union plans to ban the world’s most widely used insecticides in an effort to protect bees and other valuable pollinator insects. The ban, approved by member countries Friday, targets insecticide compounds known as neonicotinoids (also called neonics for…

See the Faces of Immigrants in 1917 America

PUBLISHED April 26, 2018 One hundred years ago, National Geographic wrote that immigration in the U.S. had never «occupied such a deep place in the mind of its people.» A year before the end of the First World War, Congress passed the Immigration Act of 1917, which drastically restricted the flow of immigrants attempting to…

Within Decades, Floods May Render Many Islands Uninhabitable

ANTARCTICA IS MELTING AT A DANGEROUS PACE—HERE’S WHY PUBLISHED April 25, 2018 For the Marshall Islands, climate change isn’t some distant, future danger: It is already wreaking havoc across the Pacific country’s more than 1,100 low-lying atolls. Now, a new study claims that climate change may soon deal the country’s water supplies a death blow….

How We’ve Tackled the Evolving Science of DNA

View Images The four letters of the genetic code—A, C, G, and T—are projected onto a Ugandan man. Photograph by Robin Hammond, National Geographic PUBLISHED April 25, 2018 On April 25, 1953, the journal Nature published a picture that sparked a revolution: the first drawing of the structure of the DNA molecule. That landmark discovery,…

Mysterious Arctic Ice Holes Baffle Scientists

View Images What made these odd holes in the Beaufort Sea ice? Scientists weigh in. Photograph by NASA PUBLISHED April 23, 2018 While flying over the eastern Beaufort Sea as part of NASA’s Operation IceBridge, mission scientist John Sonntag made photos of something he had never seen before on April 14: odd crater-like holes in…

How an Obsession With Rare Bird Feathers Turned Criminal

PUBLISHED April 23, 2018 “This is a very unusual crime,” Detective Inspector Fraser Wylie of the Hertfordshire Constabulary, in southern England, said at the time. It happened one night in November 2009, when Edwin Rist, a 20-year-old American, broke into the British Natural History Museum at Tring, one of the world’s greatest repositories of exotic…

This Storm Chaser Risked It All for Tornado Research

PUBLISHED April 21, 2018 We all know the famous scene from the Wizard Of Oz, when Dorothy is transported by a twister to a magical new land. For modern-day storm chasers like Tim Samaras, who received several grants from the National Geographic Society and is the hero of Brantley Hargrove’s The Man Who Caught the…

Bizarre Squid Seen Alive for First Time

April 19, 2018 — This might or might not be a new species of squid. The crew from NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer filmed the unusual squid with their remote submarine, thousands of feet beneath the surface. For now, biologists must speculate on the creature’s anatomy and behavior. PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 In the Gulf of Mexico,…

Deepest Octopus Nursery Discovered, Holds Dark Secret

April 20, 2018 — Reviewing underwater footage from the waters off Costa Rica, marine biologists discovered something unusual—hundreds of octopus moms, incubating their eggs. The location, 1.2 miles below the surface, is much deeper than expected to find an octopus nursery. They normally seek out cooler waters to sit with their eggs, but this rocky…

5 Times People Used Trees to Change the World

View Images Seen in August 2011, Felix Finkbeiner has made it his life’s goal to plant trees. And he is getting a lot of help. Photograph by Benno Kraehahn PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 In honor of Earth Day, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite National Geographic stories on people making a big impact around…

How You Can Participate in Earth Day

Earth Day — Astronauts Reflect on Earth PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 Need some motivation to get into the Earth Day spirit? Try turning on Nat Geo WILD’s Spotify playlist. If that still hasn’t done it for you, try watching scenes from National Geographic’s show One Strange Rock. It’s told through the perspective of the only…

How the Environment Has Changed Since the First Earth Day

View Images Ash spews from a coal-fueled power plant. Photograph by Emory Kristof, National Geographic PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 When Earth Day was first created in 1970, it rode the coattails of a decade filled with social activism. Voting rights were strengthened, civil rights were outlined, and women were demanding equal treatment. But there was…

Enzyme That Eats Plastic Accidentally Found in Lab

Here’s How Much Plastic Trash Is Littering the Earth PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 It’s a potential breakthrough in the fight against plastic pollution—an enzyme that can digest plastic that is commonly found polluting our environment. The discovery could oneday result in a recycling solution that can process millions of tonnes of plastic, made from polyethylene…

Stench Leads to Home Crawling With Stolen Tortoises—10,000 of Them

View Images Authorities found 10,000 radiated tortoises, a critically endangered species, crammed into a house in Toliara, Madagascar. Photograph courtesy DREEF Atsimo Andrefana PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 Soary Randrianjafizanaka set out with police, colleagues, and others earlier this month to investigate a rancid smell coming from a two-story house in Toliara, a town on the…

How to See the 2018 Lyrid Meteor Shower

View Images Sky-watchers in Kutahya, Turkey, observe the Lyrid meteor shower in April 2014. Photograph by Fatma Selma Kocabas Aydin, Anadolu Agency, Getty Images PUBLISHED April 20, 2018 Sky-watchers will get a chance to witness one of the oldest known annual meteor showers this weekend—and conditions promise to be ideal for viewing the shooting stars….

How to Create a Music Score for Our Planet

This Earth Day, Nat Geo WILD embarks on a symphonic celebration of the beauty of our planet in a new television event Symphony for Our World, which airs commercial free this Earth Day, Apr. 22 at 7/6c on Nat Geo WILD. PUBLISHED April 19, 2018 What instrument characterizes a herd of running bison? What sound…

6 Female Artists Who Turned Modern Art On Its Head

View Images A visitor takes in Tarsila do Amaral’s «Inventing Modern Art in Brazil» exhibit at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Photograph by Timothy A. Clary, Getty Images PUBLISHED April 19, 2018 This story is part of Women of Impact, a National Geographic project centered around women breaking barriers in their fields, changing their…

First-of-Its-Kind Footage Shows Cells Moving in Live Animals

PUBLISHED April 19, 2018 For hundreds of years, images of cells have come from isolated specimens sitting on glass slides, removed from their intricate and subtle cellular universes within living organisms. Now, using a new imaging technique described in Science on Thursday, living cells can be filmed in high-resolution and 3-D, producing stunning videos of…

Prehistoric Toothless Whale Among Oldest of Its Kind

PUBLISHED April 19, 2018 A fossil found on the South Island of New Zealand is now one of the earliest members of the filter-feeding family of behemoths known as baleen whales. Modern baleen whales include many of the world’s largest cetaceans, such us blue, fin, humpback, right, bowhead, and minke whales. The new species has…

‘Exploding Ant’ Rips Itself Apart To Protect Its Own

View Images The ant lacks large mandibles, cannot sting, and generally seems like easy pickings for any predator—until one approaches. Photograph by Alexey Kopchinskiy PUBLISHED April 19, 2018 High in the treetops of Borneo, there’s an ant with a deadly secret. It can explode. On the outside, it’s just an inconspicuous, brownish-red ant. It lacks…

How Deep-Sea Fish Are So Exceptionally Black

View Images The threadfin dragonfish lives more than two miles deep in the eastern Atlantic. Photograph by Sonke Johnsen PUBLISHED April 18, 2018 In the vast, featureless darkness of the oceans, fish take camouflage to a new art form. How do you blend in with nothing? Viperfish and creatures like it have evolved ever blacker—we’re…

See the Last Footage of Rare Tree-Climbing Lions

PUBLISHED April 18, 2018 Tree Lions to premier as part of Nat Geo Wild‘s Big Cat Week in November 2018. “There are no villains in this story.” That’s what National Geographic Explorer Alex Braczkowski told me when we sat down for a quick chat on Tuesday. Braczkowski said he was devastated by the news that…

See This Incredible Artist Draw a Whole City From Memory

View Images After flying just once over Mexico City, artist Stephen Wiltshire drew the entire cityscape from memory on a 13-foot canvas. Photograph by Paolo Woods, National Geographic PUBLISHED April 18, 2018 Today, Stephen Wiltshire is one of Britain’s best-known artists. His commissions have a four- to eight-month waiting list, and videos of him sketching…

First Bat Removed From U.S. Endangered Species List

View Images Since the 1980s, the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae) had been listed as endangered, but now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has delisted it, in light of the species’s recovery. Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark PUBLISHED April 17, 2018 In a conservation first made possible by volunteers, scientists, and…

Biologists Attempt to Save Orphaned Baby Bat

PUBLISHED April 17, 2018 At a glance, it looks like a mix between a Chihuahua and a dragon. A baby fruit bat, not often seen up close, was recently taken in by two biologists who attempted to save its life in Borneo. A storm had hit the region only the night before, and they reasoned…

Diamonds From Outer Space Formed Inside a Long-Lost Planet

View Images A black fragment from a ureilite meteorite sits in contrast against the light-colored rocks normally found in Sudan’s Nubian desert. Photograph by Peter Jenniskens, SETI Institute, NASA Ames PUBLISHED April 17, 2018 Diamonds that fell to Earth inside a meteorite may contain the remnants of our solar system’s first planets, protoworlds that were…

Ancient Chronicles Show Modern Demise of Snub-Nosed Monkeys

View Images The luxurious pelt and distinctive face of the golden snub-nosed monkey grabbed the attention of ancient Chinese chroniclers. Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark PUBLISHED April 17, 2018 In 11th century China, the scholar Lu Dian wrote an encyclopedia of his country’s beasts, birds, insects, and trees. One of the species…

This Film Crew Might Be the First to See Humpbacks Give Birth

View Images A humpback whale swims off the coast of Maui. Photograph by Flip Nicklin, Minden Pictures/National Geographic Creative PUBLISHED April 17, 2018 Chris Clifone and his crew will be actively updating Open Explorer, National Geographic’s digital field journal. Learn more and follow along with their journey. It was sudden when the humpback whale popped…

Why We Created This First-of-Its-Kind Digital Field Journal

View Images National Geographic Explorer Alex Paullin and his crew travelled from Cape Town’s drying coast to Tanzania’s melting glacier to create eco-educational music with local NGOs and musicians. Photograph courtesy Alex Paullin, Conservation Music PUBLISHED April 17, 2018 There has never been a better time to be a curious person. Science has pushed our…

This Is What One of the Last Great Migrations Looks Like

See thousands of migratory Sandhill cranes roost on the Platte River and feast on corn during their spring stopover in central Nebraska. PUBLISHED April 16, 2018 Through unyielding winds and icy rain, a long-legged, gray bird flaps its wings across the overcast Nebraska sky. Its squawk echoes an ancient call that has reverberated through this…

The Race to Save the World’s Disappearing Languages

PUBLISHED April 16, 2018 On a residential block at the border between Brooklyn and Queens, Gottscheer Hall appears like a mirage from 1945. Blue awnings advertise the space for weddings and events. Inside, an entryway is covered with the saccharin smiles of “Miss Gottschee” contestants from decades past. “Back then you had to know the…

How This New Probe Will Hunt for ‘Alien’ Earths

View Images An illustration shows the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, which will scan the sky to find planets around relatively nearby stars. Illustration by NASA, GSFC PUBLISHED April 14, 2018 On Monday, NASA’s next planet hunter is slated to take to the skies aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from Cape Canaveral,…

Where Did Picasso’s Genius Come From?

View Images A visitor pauses to study Pablo Picasso’s «Les Demoiselles d’Avignon» at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The 1907 painting is credited for the birth of the Cubism style of painting, and is said to be Picasso’s most tortured, and most successful, painting. Photograph by Fausto Giaccone, Anzenberger/Redux PUBLISHED April 14,…

As Koalas Suffer From Chlamydia, A New Clue For Treatment

View Images Koalas are declining in Australia due to habitat loss and human encroachment. Photograph by Doug Gimesy, National Geographic Creative PUBLISHED April 14, 2018 Australia‘s iconic koala has a problem that keeps boomeranging back. Chlamydia, a type of sexually transmitted disease also found in humans, has hit wild koalas hard, with some wild populations…

Turtle With Green Mohawk Faces Extinction

PUBLISHED April 13, 2018 Unbeknownst to the Mary river turtle, the Australian species has been labelled a punk. Perhaps it’s the little green mohawk, made of algae strands that grow on its body, or the novel fact that it breathes through its genitals (sometimes for three days in a row)—but the Mary river turtle became…

8 Lion Cubs Killed in Suspected Poison Attack

View Images This cub is one of eight that died this week in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park, likely from poisoning. Photograph by Alexander Braczkowski PUBLISHED April 13, 2018 Wildlife authorities found 11 lions dead from suspected poisoning in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park, in the southwest of of the country, on April 10. The…

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